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Asher James
Asher James

A Serbian Film Uncut Download 17l



The initial plan was to release an "R" rated version to chain theaters nationwide and an uncut version to independent theaters in larger metropolitan areas. At the same time the company was going to make the film available online and uncut, via FlixFling, an online movie delivery portal. Then two things happened. The programmer of the Sitges Film Festival was charged with exhibiting child pornography after screening the film and when Invincible submitted a cut version to the MPAA the film still received an NC-17 rating.




A Serbian Film Uncut Download 17l



The Sitges fiasco seems to have freaked Invincible out, as suddenly they were no longer releasing an uncut version anywhere, any time. I've read the NC-17 version has anywhere from 2 to 4 minutes of the film removed (the U.K. release was the most-edited film ever in that country, losing more than four minutes). The new plans called for the theatrical release, the FlixFling download, and future DVD and Blue-Ray releases to all be edited in various amounts. Sadly, this will likely result in the continuing illegal download of the uncut screener version that's been seen world-wide over the past year.


Today Invincible stated that the version on FlixFling will be essentially uncut, with only 5 seconds edited out. If you've seen the film you know those 5 seconds are coming from one of two moments (possibly both) in the film. In my opinion, leaving those images on the cutting-room floor isn't necessarily a bad thing- whoever said you can't unsee some things, even if it's in a movie, was right when it comes to ASF. The company also stated the film will be released in more cities than the original four, though they didn't say where or when.


Essentially, Invincible botched it and are now attempting to recover, but has the damage been done? They chose to play with fire and got burned by what happened at Sitges. I have little empathy for them, though having actually seen an uncut version of ASF in a theater, I would wish that anyone inclined to see the film would be able to experience it in the same way I did. It is truly horrific, but it's also an incredibly well-made film on every level- that's part of what's so unnerving about it. But it's not going to happen.


Publicists whispered to journalists that the film was truly "vile". Prior to its AFM screenings, the movie had already been yanked out of Frightfest in London when Westminster Council ruled it couldn't be shown in its uncut form and had started frenzied debates about censorship and freedom of speech. The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) had asked for a staggering number of cuts in the film and for a full four minutes of footage to be excised in order for it to qualify for an 18 certificate.


In addition to the uncut, uncensored version of the film, viewers will also get to watch commentary with Srdjan Spasojevic, Stephen Biro, Joe Lynch and Adam Green of The Movie Crypt, a Q&A with Srdjan Spasojevic and Jelena Gavrilović as well as from the Brussels International Fantastic Film Festival.


(a) Pursuant to the "Destruction of Public Records Law," P.L. 1953, c.410 (N.J.S.A. 47:3-15 to 32 as amended), the photograph, microphotograph, microfilm, or data processed or image processed document or a certified copy of a public record shall have the same force and effect as the original record, provided it conforms to the standards, procedures and rules established by the Division of Archives and Records Management with the approval of the State Records Committee, and the original records may be destroyed or the records therein effectively obliterated, provided said Division has first given its written consent to such destruction or other disposition.(b) The following standards must be met for documentation and authentication before permission to destroy the originals is granted:1. Since many factors are involved in the use of microphotography for records management, a careful analysis of each record group should be made before microfilming. Following are some of the most important factors in determining which records are to be filmed:i. Retention period and volume are perhaps the most important aspects to consider. Since microfilming is expensive, only a large volume of records with retention periods of seven years or longer are ordinarily considered good candidates for microfilming. There are, however, exceptions to this rule of thumb. Records of shorter retention periods but of such volume or use that storage becomes a problem would be one such exception.ii. Another important factor to be considered is the usage and rate of reference to records. Records with high reference rates or unusual methods of indexing or retrieval may be poor subjects for microfilming.iii. The records considered for filming must be sufficiently arranged, identified and indexed to insure reasonable ease in locating and retrieving individual documents after they are microfilmed.2. When converting documents to microfilm, appropriate measures must be taken to insure quality, legality, and adequate access to information contained on the microfilm.i. The records to be filmed must be arranged, identified and indexed so as to insure efficient access to and retrieval of records after microfilming.(1) When filming original source documents, place indexes, registers, or other finding aids, if microfilmed, either in the first frames of the first roll of film or in the last frames of the last roll of film of a series.(2) For microfiche, indices should be placed in the last frames of the last microfiche or microfilm jacket of a series.(3) On computer-generated microforms, indices should follow the data on a roll of film or in the last frames of a single microfiche, or the last frames of the last fiche in a series.(4) Other index locations may be used only if dictated by special system constraints, provided such procedures are approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Micrographics and Alternate Records Storage or the Supervisor of Micrographic Services.ii. The microforms must contain all information shown on the original records to ensure that they can be used for the purposes the original records served.iii. Raised seals on documents shall be shaded or highlighted in order to render them visible for reproduction unless such measures would obscure signatures or other information recorded on a map, drawing or other document or such a seal is not required by law, regulation, or practice.(1) If a raised seal is required for a document and is not shaded or highlighted, the document should be annotated with a stamp, label or other means to indicate a raised seal was present on the document when it was reproduced.(2) Such policies and procedures shall be documented and an affidavit with reference to the same shall be included in each roll film pursuant to (b)9 below.iii. A master negative shall be created and maintained, pursuant to (b)13 below for any microfilmed public record or records.(1) Polyester-based silver gelatin type film that conforms to ANSI/NAPM IT9.1-1996 for LE 500 film, as amended or supplemented, incorporated by reference herein, must be used for the master copies of all microforms.(2) The master roll of microfilm should be the first roll of microfilm produced, except for jacketed microfilm pursuant to (b)13iv(5) below.(3) A reference copy or use copy of microfilm must be created for use and retrieval of the records.(4) The master copy should not be used, except for creating duplicate copies, and must be stored in a secure, off-site storage facility pursuant to N.J.A.C. 15:3-3.12.iv. The formats described in ANSI/AIIM MS14-1996 as amended or supplemented, incorporated by reference herein, must be used for microfilming source documents on 16 millimeter (mm) and 35 mm roll film.(1) A reduction ratio no greater than 1:24 is recommended for typewritten or correspondence types of documents.(2) ANSI/AIIM MS23-1998 as amended or supplemented, incorporated by reference herein, shall be followed for the appropriate reduction ratio and format for meeting the image quality requirements.3. The following targets shall be utilized in the creation of all microfilm copies of public records, with the exception of microfilm created from digital images which must use image processing system targets, pursuant to (b)4 below in place of the targets used by a camera operator, as listed in this paragraph. The sequence in which they are listed is the sequence they should appear on the film.i. All roll film must have the following targets at the beginning of a roll of film, before any document images:(1) Background Density Target;(2) Resolution Chart (Industry standard resolution chart purchased from the National Institute of Technology (NIST)), including:(A) Certificate Of Authenticity; and(B) Title Target, containing information required pursuant to (b)8 below.ii. All roll film must have the following targets at the end of a roll of film, after any document images:(1) An affidavit (if applicable, pursuant to (b)9 below);(2) A Camera Operator's Certificate, to be filled out by the person that operated the camera that created the microfilm;(3) A Resolution Chart (Industry standard resolution chart purchased from the National Institute of Technology (NIST); and(4) A Background Density Target.4. The following targets shall be utilized in the creation of microfilm from digital images. These image processing system targets are to be used in place of the typical targets used by a camera operator, pursuant to (b)3 above when filming documents for microfilm. The sequence in which they are listed is the sequence they shall appear on the film:i. At the beginning of a roll of microfilm created from digital images, before any images of documents:(1) An Image Processing System Front Background Density Target;(2) An Image Processing System Front Resolution Target (Industry standard resolution target purchased from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) or International Organization for Standardization (ISO));(3) An Image Processing System Certificate Of Authenticity/Non-Destruction of Public Records, to be utilized only if the intention is to retain the original records permanently;(4) An Image Processing System Certificate Of Authenticity/Destruction of Public Records, to be utilized if the intention is to at some point destroy, if allowable, the original records;(A) This does not replace the Request for Destruction procedures; and(5) An Image Processing System Title Target.ii. At the end of a roll of microfilm created from digital images, after any images of documents:(1) An Affidavit (if applicable, pursuant to (b)9 below);(2) An Image Processing System Equipment Operator's Certificate, to be filled out by the operator of the equipment that is creating the microfilm);(3) An Image Processing System End Resolution Target (Industry standard target purchased from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) or International Organization for Standardization (ISO)); and(4) An Image Processing System End Background Density Target.5. Targets. All targets must be filled out with the required information and complete signatures.i. If any of the required information is missing, the reel must be recreated and the documents and accompanying targets filmed over again.ii. Examples of the targets given in (b)3 and 4 above may be obtained from the Bureau of Micrographics and Alternative Records Storage or the Division of Archives and Records Management.6. Resolution chart. Only original industry standard resolution charts, purchased from the National Institute of Technology (NIST), American National Standards Institute (ANSI) or International Organization for Standardization (ISO), may be used for microfilming. Printed or photocopied of resolutions charts will not provide correct readings for the inspection of the film.7. Certificate of authenticity. For a microfilm copy of a public record to have legal standing, the film must identify the person authorizing the microfilming. The Certificate of Authenticity must include the signature of the authorizing head of the agency or governing body. Copies of the original certificate may be used for microfilming.8. Title target. All roll microfilm must contain a completed Title Target containing:i. The title of records filmed;ii. The start file and end file (if known) information;iii. The reduction ratio;iv. The camera type;v. The film type; andvi. The department or agency having custody of the records.9. Affidavit. All roll film must contain, if applicable, a copy of an affidavit, signed by the camera operator or an image processing equipment operator, concerning procedures followed in filming records; such as the reproduction or non-reproduction of reverse side of documents, or the established procedures followed for labeling or stamping of maps, drawings, or other documents containing raised seals, including the seals of architects and engineers, if such seals are not shaded or highlighted to render them visible for reproduction.10. Missing operator's certificate. If any reel(s) lack a camera operator's certificate or an image processing equipment operator's certificate or if the complete signature of the camera operator or an image processing equipment operator is missing from a camera operator's certificate or an image processing equipment operator's certificate on a reel of microfilm, an agency may, upon prior notification and approval of the Chief of the Bureau of Micrographics and Alternate Records Storage or the Supervisor of Micrographics and Imaging Services, splice a certificate on the end of the reel(s). Splicing must be done after any existing targets. Addition of such documentation to a roll of film will be permitted only in those cases where the operator who actually filmed the documents on the reel(s) signs the certificate.11. Retakes. Where applicable, any retakes must be filmed along with the appropriate correction targets before and after the re-filmed documents.i. Targets indicating the beginning and end of retakes must be used.ii. The film must then be spliced onto the corresponding reel.iii. Retakes may be placed at the beginning or end of a roll of film.iv. When computer-assisted or random retrieval methods are used, retakes may be placed on the following roll with retake targets.v. Placement of retakes should be decided before the start of filming and remain consistent.12. Splices. Only heat-weld splicing is considered archival. Splices should be kept to a minimum. No more than four splices per roll will be accepted. Splices may not be made on master negatives between targets or series of documents including required beginning and ending targets. Retakes, spliced at the beginning or end of a reel must include beginning and ending targets pursuant to (b)3 and 4 above. Splicing between any other images will be allowed only within duplicate rolls, and then only in proper sequence. Splicing between any other images should never be made on master negatives.13. Master negatives. A master negative shall be created and maintained, pursuant to (b)2iii above, for any microfilmed public record or records. The master negative (the original reel of film produced) must meet the following standards:i. Film stock. Only a polyester-based permanent safety film with a silver halide gelatin emulsion, developed to a black and white image, that conforms to the standards of the American National Standards Institute per ANSI/NAPM IT9.1-1996 for LE 500 film, as amended or supplemented, incorporated by reference herein, may be used for the master copies of public records.ii. Density. To permit a more accurate reproduction of the original roll, each image should maintain, as far as possible, a specific density throughout the roll.(1) The Bureau Chief or Supervisor shall use judgment to determine the most suitable density within this range for the documents being filmed. Since the color of the original documents will affect the density of the image, and not all documents in a particular record series may have the same color, an average density aim point should be chosen.(2) The procedure for density measurement is described in ANSI/AIIM MS23-1998 as amended or supplemented, incorporated by reference herein.(3) Both background density and D-min density must be taken with a transmission densitometer.(4) The densitometer must meet with ANSI/NAPM IT2.18-1996, for spectral conditions and ANSI/NAPM IT2.19-1994, for geometric conditions for transmission density.(5) Readings shall be made close to the center of the film strip to avoid edge fog interference.(6) The background ISO standard visual diffuse transmission density on microforms must be appropriate to the type of documents being filmed. For most documents, optimum density should read 1.0 to 1.20 for original first generation camera film. Acceptable standards will fall between a minimum of 0.80 and a maximum of 1.35.(7) A density minimum reading taken from the non-image or clear area of the film shall not exceed a reading of 0.12 or manufacturer's specifications using automatic retrieval systems.(8) The base plus fog density of unexposed, processed films must not exceed 0.10. When a tinted base film is used, the density must be increased.iii. Resolution. Minimum resolution on microforms of source documents shall be determined using the method in the Quality Index Method for determining resolution and anticipated losses when duplicating, as described in ANSI/AIIM MS23-1998 and MS43-1998 as amended or supplemented, incorporated herein by reference.(1) Resolution tests shall be performed using an ISO 3334-1991 Resolution Test Chart and the patterns read following the instructions of ISO 3334-1991, or their equivalent.(2) A microscope having a magnification of 50X to 150X with achromatic objectives must be used to read the resolution on a resolution test chart. The line direction method will be used in making the determination of resolution. A minimum resolution of 80 lines per millimeter on rotary cameras and 110 lines per millimeter on planetary cameras must be obtained on first generation camera film.(3) The smallest characters should be used to display information to determine the height used in the Quality Index Method.(4) A Quality Index of five is required at the third generation level.(5) Due to optical limitations in most photographic systems, film images of thin lines appearing in the original document will tend to fill in as a function of their width and density. Therefore, as the reduction ratio of a given system is increased, the background density must be reduced as needed to ensure that the copies will be legible.iv. Processing. All film must be processed in accordance with procedures in ANSI/AIIM MS43-1998, incorporated herein as amended or supplemented. Dry chemical processing will not be acceptable.(1) Microforms must be processed so


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